Whether you’ve been together for months or years, you will have been through some relationship stages by now. What stage are you at now? What’s still to come?

Predict Your Future with the 10 Stages of Relationship by Months

Each connection is one-of-a-kind. It’s acceptable if what works for one marriage doesn’t work for another. Although each relationship is unique, these relationship stages tend to follow a predictable pattern over time.

A successful relationship has no set recipe, and that’s part of what makes it so intriguing. Along the way, we discover new things about ourselves and the people we love. No matter how many relationships you’ve had or how many you’ll have in the future, none of them will be the same.

Do all couples go through these stages at the same time? Not. Slower or faster, some relationships progress than others. There’s no need to stress about it; your relationship will progress at a speed that’s comfortable for both of you. Some people get married in three months, while others put it off for seven years.

Monthly breakdown of a relationship's ten stages.

Monthly breakdown of a relationship's ten stages.

Make sure to keep in mind that there’s no formula. Even so, it’s always interesting to examine the many stages of love and see where your relationship is at. You should remember that several of these stages overlap or are preceded by one another.

1. Infatuation. 

Seeing someone you’re interested in for the first time is a powerful experience that might last for days. As a result, you’re constantly thinking about them, your pulse is pounding, and you’re sexy all the time. When you’re in love, you’re in a delightful period called infatuation. Between you, there’s a lot of chemistry. Illness spreads to those who are close to you. You, on the other hand, don’t seem to mind.

Your world is your own. You don’t perceive each other’s shortcomings or vulnerabilities at this phase. In most cases, it lasts six months or more.

2. The Getting Started phase. 

You’ve gotten through the initial infatuation stage and are now getting to know each other better. You have more in-depth discussions and spend more time getting to know each other intellectually. Even if you’re still attracted to one another, you can have a conversation without being sidetracked by thoughts of sexual pleasure. Symptoms might continue anywhere from 18 months to three years, depending on the severity.

3. It’s at this point that things begin to take shape. 

After a few months of dating, you and your partner will fight. Conflicts can develop now that you’re out of the infatuation stage, and you can evaluate how well you can handle them. If a couple is unable to resolve their differences, this is where their relationship may come to an end. After the initial introduction stage, which might linger for a long time, this occurs.

4. This is where people voice their opinions. 

It’s been a while since you’ve seen each other. In this relationship stage, you’re both coming to terms with who you are and what you want out of it. Those who discover that reality differs from their expectations may feel let down. For example, your partner may not be as committed as you had hoped.

5. It’s time for “Fixing.” 

We all know that it’s impossible to “repair” your relationship; therefore, I don’t want to use the word “cure” here. Then then, I think it’s more of a molding process. To have the finest possible connection, you’re working on the relationship and trying to address things such as behavioral issues. Learn to compromise and decide whether or not this is something you want to do.

6. The stage of doubt. 

You’ve attempted to “mold” each other and work on problems in the relationship, and that’s helped. We’re all just people. Long-term transformations might take years to complete. Naturally, you may not enjoy some elements of your spouse, and that’s perfectly natural.

These flaws are examined to see if they are ones you can handle in a long-term partnership throughout this step of the dating process. During this time, disagreements are common, and the couple’s ability to work together is crucial to their survival.

7. This is the stage of sexual deprivation known as sexual dryness. 

In most relationships, sex becomes routine within three to two years of being together. The six-month mark, however, is when many people begin to grow bored after the initial stage of infatuation. It’s up to you and each other whether or not you want to explore and experiment with sex.

8. The phase of faith. 

You’ve been through enough together to know that no matter what happens, you’ve got each other’s backs. In a relationship, this is an excellent location. In this stage, you and your past experiences are responsible for the outcome. When it comes to trust, some people require a long time to build up, while others can trust quickly in new connections.

9. It’s time to make a decision. 

You and your partner have become closer and more trusting of one another. As a result, you have made a promise to each other. As soon as you’ve found the person you want to spend the rest of your life with, it’s time to move forward. Around two years into a relationship, most couples decide to tie the knot. However, it all hinges on the relationship between the two people involved.

10. The stage of expansion. 

Because you decided to stay together, I think it’s wonderful. You’re now ready to go forward. A good and healthy foundation for the partnership is already in place, and you’re still working to improve yourself and your connection.

Remember that every relationship is different and may follow its course. A month-by-month breakdown of a relationship isn’t relatively as straightforward as you may think. You’re doing the proper thing as long as it makes you feel happy.

Similar articles you might like: Changes to Expect When You’re Dating in Your ThirtiesEverybody Should Know These Relationship Psychology FactsDo’s And Don’ts During The Early Stage Of A Relationship

This site uses cookies to offer you a better browsing experience. By browsing this website, you agree to our use of cookies.